Lenten Book Group Forming

Last summer, as a congregation, we read Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon To White America by Michael Eric Dyson, and then met together on an evening in August to discuss the book.

This year, we would like to offer a six-week book group during Lent in an effort to “unpack” the book and grow further through the experience together. If you are interested in being a part of this book group, please contact Jenn Boelter at jenneepiejoi@aol.com, and more information will be provided as Lent approaches.

Adult Forums in February

Sunday mornings at 10:00

Feb. 4 – Peanut Butter Miracles!

PRLC members Rody and Alice Rowe led a nutrition program for six years serving severely malnourished children in the Democratic Republic of Congo. They will tell the story of that calling and reflect on:

  • The vocational call on all followers of Jesus
  • The “Feed Congo Kids” venture
  • Life in the Congo
  • On-going work in the Congo through a non-profit called “Our Family in Africa”

Feb. 11 – No Forum today

All ages are invited to come take part in the Lent Event.

Feb. 18 – Lutheran World Relief: Helping Families in Poor Communities across the World

Come and learn what you are doing through Lutheran World Relief around the world to break the cycle of poverty and to respond to some of the world’s worst humanitarian crises. In addition to financial gifts, did you know that the quilts tied on Tuesday mornings at PRLC go to Lutheran World Relief efforts?  Our guest speaker will be Reverend Jonathan Buck, philanthropic advisor for LWR.

Feb. 25 – Welcoming the Stranger: Sanctuary and Faith-Based Solidarity for Such a Time as This

Acts of accompaniment and solidarity, sanctuary and immigration rights, are all part of the Christian tradition. As people of faith, public witness rooted in our relationships with immigrants and refugees can help lead us toward the vision of the Beloved Community.  How are we called to act in “such a time as this?” Our guest speaker will be Michael Ramos, Executive Director of the Seattle Greater Council of Churches.


Spirited Women Beginning New Book Study

Spirited Women is a group of women who meet every Wednesday morning to talk about the book they’re reading, as well as the questions, doubts, and certainties of daily faithful living. Their first meeting of the year will be January 10, 2018 at 10:00 am in the Tree of Life room. They are starting a new book: Bitten by a Camel: Leaving Church, Finding God, by Kent Dobson. Books are available for purchase at the Grace Station on Sunday morning (cost $20, payable by check or exact change only), or at Phinney Books, across the street from the church, where you will receive a discount if you mention Spirited Women. The book is also available for download on to electronic readers.

Start the new year off by joining Spirited Women for spirited conversation, coffee, tea, and treats. All are welcome.


Adult Forums in January

Sundays at 10:00 a.m. in Tree of Life

January 7, 2018
Welcoming Refugees
How can we welcome those who are fleeing violence and persecution? Please join Sam Altis from Lutheran Community Services this morning to learn what it’s like for refugees arriving in the US, what the current state of refugee resettlement is both nationally and locally, and some ways you can be involved in welcoming refugee families.

January 14, 2018
Mark: The Gospel of Surprise
During this year, most of our Gospel readings come from Mark.  What is unique about Mark’s Gospel?   What is Mark’s contribution to our understanding of Jesus and the Christian life?  Mark has been described as the “Master of Surprise.”  How does this Gospel surprise us?  Join Pastor Hansen for the conversation.

January 21, 2018
Jessica Zimmerle from Earth Ministries
For over 25 years, Earth Ministry has been inspiring and mobilizing the faith community to play a leadership role in environmental stewardship and advocacy. Join us on January 21 for an engaging adult forum on care for creation led by Jessica Zimmerle, Program & Outreach Director for Earth Ministry. We will explore the connection between faith and sustainability, think about how our congregation can get involved, and learn tools to advocate for the protection of our one and only planet.

January 28, 2018
Congregational Meeting—No Adult Forum
Due to the PRLC Annual congregational meeting, there will be no Adult Forum on January 28th.


Refugees: an Epiphany BfJ Book Study

Wednesdays Jan. 10– Feb. 7, 2018

The worst refugee crisis since WWII is upon us: With 34,000 people fleeing their homes a day and a total of 65 million displaced persons in the world, 20 million of which are refugees, there is a major crisis going on awaiting our awakening. Join Vicar Gompf as she leads you through conversation and a reading of “Seeking Refuge” by Stephan Bauman. Vicar Gompf also recommends the book “Refugee” by Alan Gratz for teenagers, and for families with younger children, “My Name Is Not Refugee” by Kate Milner.  Please purchase your adult BFJ book prior to attendance. A few copies are available for sale at Grace Station ($15), and you will also find them in stock across the street at Phinney Books.


Circles in January

This month’s theme: Refugees

What does the Bible say about the treatment of refugees? Who were refugees in the Bible and why? How does our response to refugees help or hinder? Vicar Pam  Gompf will lead the women’s circles in January on a journey of the refugees of the Bible and how biblical response to refugees over the millennia has changed … or not.

Bethany Circle will meet January 8 at 9:30 at the home of JoAnn Thuring.

Salem Circle will meet January 24 at 10:00 at Randi Valdok’s home.


Phinney Reads!

Since mid-January, a group of Phinney people have been working with the ELCA’s “Troubling the Waters for the Healing of the Church” curriculum. Its subtitle is “A Journey for White Christians from Privilege to Partnership.”  We’ve looked at US history and church history through a non-white lens. While we’ve completed the curriculum, I think it’s safe to say that we all feel that we’ve only begun the work.

We’d like to invite you to join us in this journey.  Following the model of Spirited Women, we’d like to read a book together. So this summer we are offering Phinney Reads! and encouraging everyone in the congregation to read Tears We Cannot Stop, by Michael Eric Dyson. This book is intense. Its message is urgent, uncomfortable, and yet hopeful. The book tells a story that our black neighbors deeply want us to hear. Let’s listen.

Phinney Books, our local bookstore (nearly across the street from PRLC, at 7405 Greenwood Ave N), has agreed to keep this book well-stocked, and will offer a 20% discount to anyone purchasing the book this summer.

We’re planning a book discussion at the end of August to talk about it. We hope you can join us.


Eucharistic Practice in the Midst of Economic Injustice

Saturday, May 6, 9am-3pm at Phinney Ridge Lutheran Church

In this 500th Anniversary of the Reformation year you are invited to a workshop that explores the revolutionary reforms promoted by Martin Luther and early Lutheran congregations.

These reforms linked sacramental practice with social assistance.  There will be time to consider the relevance of Luther’s economic and social writings, many of which speak to contemporary issues that ask for an informed Christian response in word and deed.

This workshop is led by Dr. Samuel Torvend, an Episcopal Priest and Professor of the History of Christianity at Pacific Lutheran University.  He is author of Daily Bread, Holy Meal: Opening the Gifts of Holy Communion and Luther and the Hungry Poor: Gathered Fragments, an examination of Luther’s response to the poor.


Wednesday Evening Adult Study

For the remainder of Bread for the Journey Pastor Van Kley will lead a discussion about the ELCA’s newest social statement on Faith, Sexism, and Justice, which is still being formulated. This important and timely conversation will take place at 6:30 on May 10 and 17 in the Fireside Room. All are welcome!

Eucharistic Practice in the Midst of Economic Injustice

Eucharistic Practic in the Midst of Economic Injustice

The cry of the poor has become your own cry; our hunger and thirst for justice is your own desire.
~ Eucharistic Prayer VII Evangelical Lutheran Worship

a workshop at Phinney Ridge Lutheran Church

in commemoration of the
500th Anniversary of the Reformation

Saturday, May 6, 2017
9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.


Some of Martin Luther’s reforms linked sacramental practice with social assistance.

  • What was the relevance of Luther’s economic and social writings?
  • What does that mean for the church today?

Led by Dr. Samuel Torvend, Professor of the History of Christianity at Pacific Lutheran University. Dr. Torvend is the author of Luther and the Hungry Poor: Gathered Fragments and Daily Bread, Holy Meal: Opening the Gifts of Holy Communion